Our work

MCC's work in Haiti is built around relationships with our Haitian partners. From our first projects in 1958, to today, MCC's approach in Haiti has focused on accompanying Haitian organizations, listening to local needs and amplifying existing grassroots projects. While historically our projects have ranged from disaster relief to health care delivery, education to housing, our current work in Haiti is focused around several core themes:

Food security and sustainable livelihoods

Fleurimond Konsel, Kabay farmer and participant in an MCC supported community seed bank. 

Fleurimond Konsel, Kabay farmer and participant in an MCC supported community seed bank. 

MCC Haiti believes that environmental protection, food security, and sustainable livelihoods are deeply intertwined and are often best addressed together. Our work in this area began with agricultural extension workers and veterinary projects over 55 years ago in Haiti's north, and today focuses on the following:

  • Building the capacity of peasant cooperatives and associations to address the challenges of a rapidly changing climate and persistent drought, worsening terms of international trade, severely limited infrastructure, and few opportunities for value added processing in rural areas. 
  • Developing community tree nurseries and assisting in reforestation and tree conservation efforts at both the household and community levels. 
  • Supporting clubs and education for children and youth that teach methods for sustainable agriculture and the importance of environmental conservation at the community level.
  • Encouraging the development of decentralized agriculture and vocational training targeted to the needs of local communities. 
  • Supporting rural and urban Haitian artisan workshops through accompaniment in training, design and production process.

Peace and restorative justice

To bring attention to the cholera epidemic in Haiti and the UN's responsibility to do more for its victims, MCC partnered with InsideOut and several other Haitian and U.S.-based organizations to create the FACE|JUSTICE campaign.

To bring attention to the cholera epidemic in Haiti and the UN's responsibility to do more for its victims, MCC partnered with InsideOut and several other Haitian and U.S.-based organizations to create the FACE|JUSTICE campaign.

MCC believes God calls us to a life of peace, nonviolence, and right relationships with one another. MCC Haiti's peace program works to make peace and restorative justice a concrete action and promotes the pursuit of peace in the following areas:

  • Teaching and supporting conflict resolution skills building and programs in neighborhoods, schools and churches.
  • Supporting innovative restorative justice initiatives to reduce prolonged pre-trial incarceration in Haiti’s prison system. 
  • Supporting peace, anger management, and violence reduction programming with at risk children and youth.
  • Building resilience and responding to psychological needs through trauma support
  • Providing churches and schools with educational and advocacy resources about peace.
  • Facilitating dialogue and relationship-building across cultural and socioeconomic divides; working to build more just and inclusive relationships within Haiti, and with its neighbors.
  • Building partner capacity to advocate with international organizations and governmental bodies working in Haiti.
  • Helping to amplify the voice of local partners by communicating their messages to the international community.

 

Education and support for vulnerable children and youth

Darose Thamania, 7, does schoolwork as class happens under tarps following the 2010 earthquake. With MCC's support, her school was rebuilt in Croix des Bouquets, Haiti, outside Port-au-Prince.

Darose Thamania, 7, does schoolwork as class happens under tarps following the 2010 earthquake. With MCC's support, her school was rebuilt in Croix des Bouquets, Haiti, outside Port-au-Prince.

MCC Haiti partners with local organizations providing education, mentoring, leadership training, psycho-social support, medical care, legal assistance and vocational training to some of the most vulnerable children and young adults in Haiti. Many of these vulnerable young people come from the city's most unstable neighborhoods, live on the street, or are caught in the restavek system of domestic child servitude. MCC believes that by integrating wrap-around services, targeting the most vulnerable children and youth in each community and providing a safe and nurturing space to learn and grow, they can be given the chance to help shape Haiti's future for the better.  Our current program areas include:

  • Education programs targeting vulnerable children in the Port-au-Prince area seeking shelter, food, and primary education. 
  • Vocational training schools that provide concrete practical skills and employment opportunities to vulnerable youth.
  • Partnerships with local human rights and advocacy organizations to provide aid, advocacy, and legal assistance to children and youth involved with the criminal justice system in Haiti
  • Support for the reconstruction of public elementary schools destroyed by Hurricane Matthew.

 

Public health

contaminated drinking water after Hurricane Matthew.

contaminated drinking water after Hurricane Matthew.

MCC’s involvement in public and preventative health in Haiti has deep roots, and continues to address the unmet needs for cholera prevention and treatment, community mental health care, and wrap-around services for survivors of disasters, domestic violence, and sexual violence. Our work in this area began almost 60 years with MCC doctors and nurses serving in remote government clinics in undeserved communities in Northern Haiti, and continues with the following focus areas:

  • A focus on improving rural and vulnerable communities’ access to safe sanitation through public health education, latrine construction, and hygiene infrastructure.
  • Community trauma support and training for survivors of natural disasters.
  • After school kids education clubs which focus on nutrition, education and hygiene.
  • Support for the rehabilitation and expansion of cholera treatment facilities after Hurricane Matthew.
  • Improving access to clean water in rural areas, including potable water systems as well as rain water catchment cisterns.
  • Responding to the increased risk and needs of women and girls who experience physical and sexual violence through wrap-around psycho social support services
  • Supporting the development and expansion of evidence-based community mental health services in the Artibonite and Central Plateau, including special focuses on children and youth, and trauma-focused care.