All tagged Desarmes

"Ils étaient comme des ficelles"

Bertha Louisius rit en décrivant le soulagement et la gratitude qu’elle ressent maintenant chaque fois qu’elle voit ses jumeaux. "Ils étaient si petits, ils étaient tellement malades. Je ne savais pas quoi faire. Je n’avais pas d’argent et rien de ce que je faisais ne fonctionnait. Je pensais qu’ils pouvaient mourir, mais je ne savais pas ce que je pouvais faire. J’avais laissé leur sort à Dieu quand j’ai rencontré ces infirmières."

They Were Like Threads

Their mother, Bertha Louisius, laughs as she describes the relief and gratitude she feels every time she sees her twins now. “They were so small, they were so sick. I didn’t know what to do. I had no money, and nothing I was doing worked. I thought they might die, but I didn’t know what I could do. I had given their fate to God when I met these nurses.”

YAMEN Reflection: From Cambodia to Haiti

I have been in Haiti for a month and so far it’s been all about adjustment, learning new things, cultural observation, eating new foods, and learning new languages. I’m starting to adapt to a lot of things, like speaking two second languages all day, waking up to the sound of Kreyol all around the house, traveling with new public transportation, saying hello to people along the way.

1982: Growing trees and developing leaders in the Artibonite Valley

“Men anpil, chay pa lou” — Many hands make the load lighter

In 2018, MCC is celebrating 60 years of work in Haiti through a series of six stories highlighting each decade.

“When you look at [the Artibonite], you can see there are more trees providing coverage for homes than there were before. If you go up to the mountains, you can see the area of Desarmes is covered in trees. There are a lot of people who have changed their economic situation. They did not have a home, but now, they have a house with a roof so they are covered when the rain comes.”

1990s: 'Even planting trees was political': MCC in military-governed Haiti

“Men anpil, chay pa lou” — Many hands make the load lighter

In 2018, MCC is celebrating 60 years of work in Haiti through a series of six stories highlighting each decade

In the late 80s and early 90s, Haiti’s military leadership began a program of violent repression. These years of political upheaval would label MCC’s work as a political threat and lead to the arrest of MCC workers.