All in Sustainable Livelihoods

Coming Home to Kabay

Remis Pierre returned to his home community of Kabay after a stint working in the neighboring Dominican Republic, and has now been able to make a living for himself at home as a result of an MCC agroforestry project. He wants to encourage other young people in his community to "take heart and work together" to make a better future for themselves and their families.

1982: Growing trees and developing leaders in the Artibonite Valley

“Men anpil, chay pa lou” — Many hands make the load lighter

In 2018, MCC is celebrating 60 years of work in Haiti through a series of six stories highlighting each decade.

“When you look at [the Artibonite], you can see there are more trees providing coverage for homes than there were before. If you go up to the mountains, you can see the area of Desarmes is covered in trees. There are a lot of people who have changed their economic situation. They did not have a home, but now, they have a house with a roof so they are covered when the rain comes.”

Infographic: Reforesting Haiti

In Haiti, MCC is working with local communities and partners to plant millions of trees in the areas that need them most. MCC started reforestation work in Haiti in the 80s and the work has continued to this day: over the last five years, we’ve planted 2,368,964 trees, including 393,933 fruit trees. Not only do families benefit from nutritious food and the income from fruit and lumber sales, whole communities thrive as a result of healthier ecosystems—take a look at the infographic below to learn how.

Peace After the Storm

During MCC’s Hurricane Matthew response, local leaders in Wondo and Wopisa expressed their need for long-term food security. There was a desire to rebuild gardens, livestock, and strengthen their community as a whole. Local leaders saw the potential for these communities to respond by supporting one another rather than fighting for aid. In response, MCC launched a 2-year food security project that would provide opportunities for peacebuilding in both communities.

Ti Mango's Living Pantry: Growing Food Security in Kabay

Judiuc Lundi was born in Haiti in the mango season. His mother called him Ti Mango, or “little mango” in Creole, and the nickname stuck. Ti Mango, proudly shows off his thriving garden in the agricultural community of Kabay, tucked into the rolling hills of Haiti’s Artibonite department.

Ti Mango’s plot of land extends down the slope of a hill into an unevenly formed valley, demonstrating the skill that rural farmers like him must possess to farm such tough mountainous terrain in Haiti.