Infographic: Reforesting Haiti

In Haiti, MCC is working with local communities and partners to plant millions of trees in the areas that need them most. MCC started reforestation work in Haiti in the 80s and the work has continued to this day: over the last five years, we’ve planted 2,368,964 trees, including 393,933 fruit trees. Not only do families benefit from nutritious food and the income from fruit and lumber sales, whole communities thrive as a result of healthier ecosystems—take a look at the infographic below to learn how.

Video: Playing soccer for peace in Cité Soleil

Cité Soleil, a community in Port-au-Prince, is stigmatized by others in Haiti and the rest of the world as an area of extreme violence and competing gangs.

MCC partner SAKALA (Sant Kominote Altènatif Ak Lapè (SAKALA), The Community Center for Peaceful Alternatives) has developed a peace education tool that the youth are thrilled about—soccer.
 

Good Friday on Mon Kalve

About an hour east of Port-au-Prince, just off the the road that leads to Santo Domingo, sits Mòn Kalvè (Calvary Mountain), a pilgrimage site during Holy Week here in Haiti. Starting just after dawn on Good Friday, a friend and I hopped on motos and made our way to the base of the mountain. We joined the faithful making their slow pilgrimage to the top (...)

1962: Responding to Disasters

Men anpil, chay pa lou’ — ‘Many hands make the load lighter’

Over the last 60 years, MCC has worked alongside Haitian partners, putting our hands together in healing suffering, cultivating the soil, supporting the vulnerable, and holding on to peace. In 2018, MCC in Haiti will celebrate this legacy through a series of six stories highlighting each decade.

On October 3, 1962, just 4 years after beginning work in Haiti, MCC responded to the aftermath of Hurricane Flora in southern Haiti.

Working towards a livable Haiti

Janvier is a member of Comite Artisanal Haïtien (CAH), an MCC partner that supports artisans by assisting them with promotion and market access. MCC hopes to provide alternatives to uprooting people and separating families by supporting sustainable livelihoods for people in their home countries, so people like Janvier can remain in Haiti and invest in their home communities. 

Haiti is unforgettable

The international press often diffuses a single narrative of Haiti—one of political instability, malnutrition, disease and devastation. Haiti is too often described simply as “the poorest country in the Western hemisphere,” ignoring the many layers that comprise Haitian culture and customs and make Haiti one of the most fascinating but least understood countries in the region.

Celebrate Haiti's Independence with Soup Joumou, Haitian Squash Soup

Haiti's history is truly remarkable. After hundreds of years of brutal slavery as part of the French colonial empire, the slaves on the French-controlled part of the island of Hispaniola (present day Haiti and the Dominican Republic) rebelled and overthrew the French, creating the world's first black republic in 1804. On January 1st, Haiti celebrates that independence, and a central part of that celebration is soup joumou.

Bonbon Siwo, Haitian Gingerbread

This holiday season, add the flavors of Haiti to your holiday table with bonbon siwo, Haitian gingerbread. Bonbon siwo is a warmly spiced, tropical gingerbread from Haiti, made over charcoal fires along busy market streets. This Haitian gingerbread cake is dark and dense with coconut milk and blackstrap molasses, and boldly flavored with fresh ginger, cloves and cinnamon.